July Update


Hey! Been awhile, but I’ve actually been working on the Halo Custom Edition tutorial series and map making again. Since I realize that people are actually visiting this site now I thought I’d put a little status update so that you know that I’m working on stuff again.

Next up is the weapons tutorial series since the beginner map tutorial is done; I want to cover all of the things you can put on your basic map before making the harder tutorials for making the map itself more complex. This way you can at least make a basic battleground for testing your other creations. For this I’m focusing on bare basics of getting something to work in Halo. This doesn’t mean they’ll be bad, it means they’ll be simple to use with very general examples. After all it’s a modding tutorial and not a tutorial on how to model or animate in 3ds max; it’s a lot less helpful for you if I spend an hour making a highly detailed model rather than 20 minutes demonstrating a workable one.

I already practiced the animation portion and it was originally going to be in lesson 2, so I expect that script to be done by today. My plans for lesson 5 or more are to cover specialty weapons that aren’t as prolific in Halo in general (Melee weapons and grenades come to mind, only 6 types of grenades or so across 6 games counting ODST and Reach and like two melee weapons, sword and hammer)

Weapons lesson 1 Modeling: [EDITING]

Weapons lesson 2 Texturing: [SCRIPT DONE]

Weapons lesson 3 Animating: [SCRIPT WRITING]

Weapons lesson 4 Effects: [PLANNING]

Weapons lesson 5+?: [PLANNING]

Also wanted to say, thanks for your words of support. I’ve been getting awesome feedback over the past few months and it’s kept me doing this in my spare time.





Preface: Graduation Time

[Under Review – Links coming soon]

This final beginner level lesson will cover the process of setting up your Halo Custom Edition map to handle objective gametypes. Capture the Flag, Oddball, Race, and pretty much any gametype that isn’t plain slayer/team slayer is considered an objective gametype for our purposes. Making your map so that it can handle multiple gametypes is fairly important if you want to package and distribute your map to other people since if they try to run, for example, capture the flag on a map you haven’t set up for capture the flag – the flags will not spawn and thus the game will be completely unplayable.

Most of this lesson will take place in Sapien with assumptions that you know how to use Sapien as detailed in lessons 0-4, especially how to navigate the folder structure in Sapien.

Read More





Preface

[Under Review – Links coming soon]

In this lesson we will cover the creation of “scenery” and “sound scenery” objects with respect to map-making in Halo Custom Edition. Scenery objects are what you would consider pretty much anything but the “walls”, whether those walls be the natural walls of a canyon or the painted walls of an apartment. For instance, a table, a couch, a cup, a stapler, etc. are all scenery objects. Sound Scenery objects can be considered as invisible and intangible scenery objects that still emit sound. You can use these objects to place sounds in your level (like the sound of birds or creepy cave ambient sounds). Since you still have control over the position of the sound scenery, you have control over where these sounds are heard and how often which can give your level some extra environmental effects without having to render anything visual.

Read More





CAPS LOCK!

So after a long hiatus I finally have something to show for it. I actually started this in 2013 but didn’t get motivated to finish it until the announcement of the re-release of my favorite game -Zelda: Majora’s Mask.

You can download and play around in the alpha version of Clock Town in Halo Custom Edition here: http://goo.gl/Dywvi9

 





5 – Adding Intersecting Geometry: Compound Objects (continued)

Move around parts of your base and parts of your level to make sure everything is hooked up right (always ctrl+z after you move something. You’re doing this just to check).

Go into your sub-selection (Modify menu) and choose Border selection, it should look like a red outlined blob. If you don’t see this, make sure you’re currently working with an editable polygon (not editable mesh). Press ctrl+A and any open borders will be selected. Patch these up. Do not expect this process to be simple, but do expect the results to be worth it. Soon enough you’ll be able to walk through and battle in your own creation.

Read More





Preface

Here’s where things get difficult, but oh so rewarding. In this two part lesson we’re going to cover how to take that little box or sphere of yours and expand it into a full fledged, hallway-having, canyon walled, oddly shaped level. You may need to practice the techniques described here several times so don’t worry if you don’t understand it on your first run through. This is where I will teach you some beginner 3d modelling techniques in relation to Halo Custom Edition map making. No matter how advanced you get at modelling, these basic techniques will always be with you and will be the foundation for further learning. Think of it like learning how to read music; you won’t instantly become a better musician that way, but it will allow you to practice larger and more difficult pieces. If you are already skilled at 3d modelling this tutorial is still for you, as there are several caveats you must pay attention to when modelling specifically Halo Maps.

Read More





Preface

This lesson is going to cover the very basics of putting some textures on your Halo Custom Edition map. There is tons and tons of detail you can go into when adding textures, but for now we’ll reserve that for later lessons. We will however add in a bit on changing the shaders (basically properties beyond the actual picture) so that they react appropriately when shot/driven on. As the saying goes “a picture is worth a thousand words” so this video must be worth a few million; if something in the text doesn’t make sense click the title of the text section to go to the appropriate video part and see what you may be missing.

Read More





Xbox Apache

Since my first look at Apache Air Assault I’ve explored more modes and missions throughout the game. Realistic mode is still unapproachable by me due to control issues, however I finally got decent at controlling the Apache in the default mode and I gotta say I had some fun. When you can finally pull around and take out targets without relying on the rocket-bait auto-hover feature missions become easier while remaining challenging. The variety of the missions continued to increase and I was especially impressed by a water-based defense mission in which you must guard three boats from destruction which was easily one of the toughest missions I had done so far.

Read More





ApacheAirAssaultI’ll admit, I’m not the worlds biggest fan of simulator-esque peripherals in my video games. I don’t buy racing wheels or anything like that unless they come with the game. Apache Air Assault is the first game I’ve come across that’s almost changed my mind. Almost. When starting up this game it’s very clear their singular goal was to show off the raw power of the Apache assault helicopter, and I’m glad to say they succeeded. Controlling the helicopter feels like you’re truly wielding a tool of great destruction as your hellfire missiles zoom in from miles away and decimate anti-air targets while your machine gun rips through buildings and vehicles whipping up clouds of dust on impact. That feels awesome. Unfortunately, controlling the Apache with a normal Xbox controller makes you feel like there’s a fat monkey on the underside of your chopper constantly swaying back and forth and making accurate assaults nearly unthinkable. This problem is amplified taking on “Realistic” mode, although I realize this is much less for me and much more for hard-core flight simulator enthusiasts (of whom I believe would be very satisfied with this game). I attempted multiple set ups with inverting and switching the stick controls, but I could just never get the hang of it which made avoiding RPG fire and enemy air units that much harder.

Read More





ArcaniaGothic4Jumping into a series without first playing a single prequel or knowing anything about it would throw off anyone’s understanding of a game. So when jumping into Arcania Gothic 4 I felt it necessary to give it some slack when it came to the back-story. Of course, when it immediately tossed in a laundry list of characters and locations haphazardly through graphics varying between “decent” and “Warcraft II cut-scene” I had to wince a bit. Clearly the story would be lost on me, but I pressed on trying my best to absorb this increasingly convoluted story along the way. It didn’t help that the very first gameplay sequence is a dream sequence in which you play a different character than you would throughout the entire rest of the game. On the plus side I did enjoy the feeling of combat in this section and the flaming sword was quite awesome indeed. I had no idea who, what, or why I was fighting, but I was willing to put that to the side for a moment. However, upon fulfilling the time-tested gaming ritual of pressing every button to figure out the controls, I was immediately disappointed. A massive chunk of your controller is completely pointless throughout most of the first chapter of this game. Both triggers, bumpers, d-pad, and the left and right thumb-stick clicks are completely disabled in the opening sequence. This limits you to your 4 main colored buttons for actions, and only one of them attacks. Naturally, my first impression was that this game was a button masher along the lines of Dynasty Warriors although worse so because I had no special move button and my normal combo was about 3 hits long. Ironically as I would find out later on, the game was specifically intended and marketed to transcend a button-masher through tons of armor and weapon customization options, none of which are even remotely present in the first chapter.

Read More




Wildrender © 2009 - 2014